Questions about the motor on the Exerfly Platform

We've been getting quite a few questions on the Exerfly Platform with the motor. So, here's a quick run down on what it is, how it works and who it's for.

We'll publish some better videos and more information on a dedicated page soon.

 

What is it?

The Exerfly Platform can be fitted with a motor to provide a boost in the eccentric phase of a movement so you can program in how much of an eccentric overload you want.

 

How does it work?

The motor is used to provide more energy to the flywheel speed in the eccentric phase of a movement. The energy boosted to the flywheel in the eccentric phase is based on how much energy the user produced in the concentric phase for each rep.

You can select from 0-80% energy boost in the Exerfly App and the motor will apply that energy boost in the form of extra speed to the flywheel in the eccentric phase.

Example: If the Eccentric Overload Boost (%) is set to 20%, the flywheel will be given 20% more energy in the eccentric phase of a movement than it had in the concentric phase. The flywheel will spin faster and the user will get an eccentric overload. The statistics in the app will reflect this.

With flywheel training, the resistance is variable, based on what how much effort is put in to it.

So the harder you pull, the harder it pulls back.

Without a motor, by the time the flywheel gets to the eccentric phase, it's already losing speed and energy and the resistance you provide slows it down even more.

With the Eccentic Overload Boost provided by the motor, by the time the flywheel gets to the eccentric phase, the speed has increased and takes significantly more strength to slow down, so you get an eccentric overload through the whole eccentric phase.


What does it feel like?

It can be pretty intense. With flywheel training, the resistance is variable based on how much effort you put in to it.

So the harder you pull, the harder it pulls back.

By the time the flywheel gets to the eccentric phase, it's already losing speed and energy and the resistance you provide slows it down even more.

With the Eccentic Overload Boost provided by the motor, by the time the flywheel gets to the eccentric phase, the speed has increased and takes significantly more strength to slow down.

If you put a reasonable amount of effort in to the concentric phase, then the eccentric phase is going to feel a lot harder.

For example, imagine pushing up in the bench press, now instead of letting gravity push the bar down, it's forced down on you hard and fast.

 

Who is it for?

While you can dial the overload down to 0 or 5%, small flywheels are still going to spin quite quickly. So it's probably not really going to be suitable for rehab or the untrained person.

It is however suitable for trained individuals who want to increase their eccentric strength and overall speed. Because you can train with fast movements while the load is constant throughout your entire movement. It can be very intense with a large load at speed.

 

Videos

These videos show a range of exercises which can be accomplished. Note: It's not very noisy, the microphone just picked up every noise and amplified it.

https://youtu.be/C-UBeNcCLu0

https://youtu.be/J_OXQHJLclw

And an athlete using it fitted to the Exerfly Rack Mount

https://youtu.be/uSnw_qr8GoM

 

What is the cost of it?

It's around US$2000 which might sound expensive, but the high current power supply used to deliver the power to the motor is almost half of the cost.

Note: If using a 110volt outlet, the motor output will be only 2/3 of that from a 240volt outlet.

BLOGJune 15, 2020

Questions about the motor on the Exerfly Platform

We've been getting quite a few questions on the Exerfly Platform with the motor. So, here's a quick run down on what it is, how it works and who it's for.

We'll publish some better videos and more information on a dedicated page soon.

 

What is it?

The Exerfly Platform can be fitted with a motor to provide a boost in the eccentric phase of a movement so you can program in how much of an eccentric overload you want.

 

How does it work?

The motor is used to provide more energy to the flywheel speed in the eccentric phase of a movement. The energy boosted to the flywheel in the eccentric phase is based on how much energy the user produced in the concentric phase for each rep.

You can select from 0-80% energy boost in the Exerfly App and the motor will apply that energy boost in the form of extra speed to the flywheel in the eccentric phase.

Example: If the Eccentric Overload Boost (%) is set to 20%, the flywheel will be given 20% more energy in the eccentric phase of a movement than it had in the concentric phase. The flywheel will spin faster and the user will get an eccentric overload. The statistics in the app will reflect this.

With flywheel training, the resistance is variable, based on what how much effort is put in to it.

So the harder you pull, the harder it pulls back.

Without a motor, by the time the flywheel gets to the eccentric phase, it's already losing speed and energy and the resistance you provide slows it down even more.

With the Eccentic Overload Boost provided by the motor, by the time the flywheel gets to the eccentric phase, the speed has increased and takes significantly more strength to slow down, so you get an eccentric overload through the whole eccentric phase.


What does it feel like?

It can be pretty intense. With flywheel training, the resistance is variable based on how much effort you put in to it.

So the harder you pull, the harder it pulls back.

By the time the flywheel gets to the eccentric phase, it's already losing speed and energy and the resistance you provide slows it down even more.

With the Eccentic Overload Boost provided by the motor, by the time the flywheel gets to the eccentric phase, the speed has increased and takes significantly more strength to slow down.

If you put a reasonable amount of effort in to the concentric phase, then the eccentric phase is going to feel a lot harder.

For example, imagine pushing up in the bench press, now instead of letting gravity push the bar down, it's forced down on you hard and fast.

 

Who is it for?

While you can dial the overload down to 0 or 5%, small flywheels are still going to spin quite quickly. So it's probably not really going to be suitable for rehab or the untrained person.

It is however suitable for trained individuals who want to increase their eccentric strength and overall speed. Because you can train with fast movements while the load is constant throughout your entire movement. It can be very intense with a large load at speed.

 

Videos

These videos show a range of exercises which can be accomplished. Note: It's not very noisy, the microphone just picked up every noise and amplified it.

https://youtu.be/C-UBeNcCLu0

https://youtu.be/J_OXQHJLclw

And an athlete using it fitted to the Exerfly Rack Mount

https://youtu.be/uSnw_qr8GoM

 

What is the cost of it?

It's around US$2000 which might sound expensive, but the high current power supply used to deliver the power to the motor is almost half of the cost.

Note: If using a 110volt outlet, the motor output will be only 2/3 of that from a 240volt outlet.

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